• Hail to Mail / Illustrations: V. Radunsky / Text: S. Marshak
    • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: V. Radunsky / Text: S. Marshak
  • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: V. Radunsky / Text: S. Marshak
    • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: V. Radunsky / Text: S. Marshak
  • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: V. Radunsky / Text: S. Marshak
    • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: V. Radunsky / Text: S. Marshak
  • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: Vladimir Radunsky / Text: Samuel Marshak
    • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: Vladimir Radunsky / Text: Samuel Marshak
  • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: Vladimir Radunsky / Text: Samuel Marshak
    • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: Vladimir Radunsky / Text: Samuel Marshak
  • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: Vladimir Radunsky / Text: Samuel Marshak
    • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: Vladimir Radunsky / Text: Samuel Marshak
  • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: V. Radunsky / Text: S. Marshak
    • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: V. Radunsky / Text: S. Marshak
  • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: V. Radunsky / Text: S. Marshak
    • Hail to Mail / Illustrations: V. Radunsky / Text: S. Marshak
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Hail to Mail

The same whimsical faces and stylish furniture seen in the team’s The Pup Grew Up! (Holt, 1989) are found in this striking book.

Mail carriers around the world chase down a man in order to deliver a specially posted envelope. ” ‘A certified letter for John Peck/Postmarked from Schenectady.’/ ‘A certified letter for John Peck?/ But he left yesterday!’ ” Rain, shine , and gloom of night pose no problems for resolute mail workers in hot pursuit of the world traveller. His letter is successfully delivered, and the jaunty poem ends with a paean to the postal system.

As in their earlier collaboration, the book’s strong graphic style echoes commercial art of the 20s, making this an unusual visual treat. Here Radunsky uses background color instead of glossy white paper, giving the pages a subdued, muddied tone. Marshak’s poem is fun and sophisticated, creating a contemporary picture book with an international flair.

From School Library Journal
Anna Biagioni Hart, Sherwood Regional Library, Alexandria, VA
Copyright 1991 Reed Business Information, Inc.

About the author

Samuel Marshak was born in 1887. His start in literary life he owed largely to Maxim Gorky, in the circle of whose family he spent part of his youth. He first appeared in print in 1907, with lyrics of his own and translations of foreign poets.

Marshak has been most prolific in the field of juvenile literature. He inculcates respect for the man who knows his job, respect for creative work.

Marshak also wrote several plays based on Russian fairy tales and designed for the juvenile stage, including Twelve Months, for which he won the Stalin Prize in 1946.